Published this week in the journal PloS ONE.

The investigators discovered that annual progression of artery wall structure thickness among those living within 100 meters of a highway was accelerated by 5.5 micrometers a year, more than twice the average progression of individuals who lived farther away. The results support emerging evidence that high-traffic corridors are unhealthy residential locations, experts said. With funding from the National Institutes of Health and the NATIONAL GOVERNMENT, through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Take action of 2009, the investigators have launched two huge studies examining the risk of ambient polluting of the environment in the early advancement of atherosclerosis in children and young adults where cardiovascular risk aspect can be low, Hodis says.

Gladstone, M.D., Associate Professor of Oncology, Clinical Director In-patient/Out-patient System , Sidney Kimmel In depth Cancer Center; and Daniel M. Harrison, M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology. Drs. Gladstone and Harrison examined multiple open-label Phase II Cyrevia studies executed at Johns Hopkins, demonstrating significant benefit for Cyrevia versus traditional outcomes in the treatment of a variety of autoimmune diseases, and proposed a controlled jointly, randomized, multi-center Stage III MS study.Gladstone, M.D., Associate Professor of Oncology, Clinical Director In-patient/Out-patient System , Sidney Kimmel In depth Cancer Center; and Daniel M. Harrison, M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology. Drs. Gladstone and Harrison examined multiple open-label Phase II Cyrevia studies executed at Johns Hopkins, demonstrating significant benefit for Cyrevia versus traditional outcomes in the treatment of a variety of autoimmune diseases, and proposed a controlled jointly, randomized, multi-center Stage III MS study.